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of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him mention stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he connected it all to the patriots of 1776. that we keep widening in our democracy. he made those places almost like battlefield spots. like oxford, mississippi or normandy or iwo jima. it's an iconic speech. >> i was going to say time and again when presidents have come here, when they've cited heroes, they've been military heroes. to talk about seneca falls and selma is more about an inclusive america with an emphasis on the equality of opportunity. not upon liberty. a republican would have traditionally given a speech about liberty. >> stonewall was the group of people most marginalized in society and the most shunned who weren't even allowed to congregate in a bar at the same time without getting harassed and arrested. >> stonewall from 1969 has been considered almost alternate left history for a while. now gay studies has come into the fold. here the president of the united states
to a second term on a holiday celebrating one of its foremost civil rights leaders. >> while these truths may be self-evident, they have never been self-executing. >> reporter: it was as much an inauguration as a cross cultural celebration. a place where a puerto rican woman raised in a housing project swears in a catholic environment from scranton, pennsylvania, where a gay cuban immigrant reads his home about a rising sun shining equally on all of us. >> my face, your face. millions of faces in morning's mirrors. >> president obama tied it all together in his speech, linking his vision to the evolving history of civil rights in the u.s. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forbearers to seneca falls and selma and stonewall. just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsong, who left footprints along this great mall, to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. >> reporter: he swore on the bibles of abraham lincoln and dr. martin luther king jr., connecticuting
stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil right era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because of you all, i am possible. and i remember we saw congressman lewis there, he was one of the people who had sort of that great turmoil because he was originally for hillary, then he said his consciousness, he changed for barack obama. i think the president gets it, he understands it, and he's very respectful of it. >> i also think about, he spoke about the fierce urgency of now early on. for many in the gay community in the united states, they didn't feel that he had that sense of fierce urgency. i think today after the speech, i think there are a lot of gay and lesbian americans who were surprised to hear a president use the word stonewall and use it in the same sentence as selma and seneca falls and would certainly argue that he now has a sense of fierce urgency
, making mentions of past civil rights struggles on that martin luther king day, seneca falls, selma, stonewall and laying out his vision for the future, advancing gay rights, tolerance toward illegal immigrants, social welfare programs and stopping climate change. dan loathian was there watching it all with us. dan, friend and foe alike have been calling this a muscular speech. >> reporter: it really was according to those who got a chance to witness the speech. the president delivering his remarks in a much more different climate than he faced four years ago when you had two wars, there was the economic crisis. this time, the president laid out a progressive agenda for the next four years. and so it began, the second inaugural ceremony of president obama, part campaign speech, part lecture, a confident president obama appeared comfortable in his skin. >> my fellow americans, we're made for this moment and we'll seize it as long as we seize it together. we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal >> our journey is not complete unti
several pivotal civil rights moments, he linked them together. dan yoth lothian has the highlights. >> reporter: this is a speech we're told the president had been working on since mid december, and he delivered it rather in a much different climate than he had four years ago, and he was dealing with two wars and also a financial crisis this time, the president used history to help define a progressive agenda for the next four years. >> please raise your right hand. >> reporter: and so it began. the second inaugural ceremony of president barack obama. part campaign speech, part pragmatic lecture, a confident mr. obama appeared comfortable in his presidential skin. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and he will shall seize it together. >> reporter: the speech was rooted in history and fittingly on this holiday, reverend martin luther king jr.'s dream. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are created equal. >> the past made modern with first-time references to climate change, immigration reform and sexual equality. >> our journey is not complete u
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
and fail without controversy. understand, a lot of civil rights leaders from that era resist putting the gay rights movement within the civil rights movement. so i think when a lot of this has gone to pass, we will remember the bigness of the gay rights. >> was it a big speech? was it a partisan speech? >> well, it was both. it had elements of boat. let me agree with what cornell said. i couldn't help but notice the man who signed the defensive marriage act, bill clinton, opposed to gay marriage changed his position during the course of his presidency. >> every speech before 2004, looking for a constitution to ban gay marriage. >> i welcome it. what i didn't welcome was the most polarizing president that we had became more polarized. this was a speech for the 51% who voted for him. there wasn't much more for the 49% who did not. it was a speech that talked about collective action by the government and when you look at the biggest issue that we face of this era, it's the deficit. it's the trillion dollars of debt and the president didn't really talk about that. he talked about, we're
inauguration coverage. i'm soledad o'brien. let's get to james clyburn, veteran of the civil rights movement to talk about inauguration day. >> nice to be here. >> our pleasure. we've heard about the two tables th bibles that president obama will be sworn in with. i'm curious to know what you think about the cyclical nature. 50 years ago, march on washington, 50 years later, a black president is being sworn in for a second term. do you -- >> right. >> is it an indication that there have been some big steps toward progress in this country? >> sure. sure. big steps. but many, many steps left to go. all of us are aware that this president came into office, like the 40th year, and a whole lot of things haven't happened, and he is -- he has been met with some really tough times. not just the reaction to him, but because of the challenges that the country faces and i believe that so much of what president obama has confronted was forecast by martin luther king jr. >> what do you mean? >> take health care, for instance. to me, one of the most important speeches ever made by king had to do with heal
honoring their achievements as well. there's a strong civil rights theme running through this parade. >> as there should be. >> as there should be. it is worth taking one last look at that on this inauguration day. >> it's a lot of history right there. a ton of history as we're watching what's going on. we'll take another quick break, resume our special coverage right here in "the situation room." [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf! cisco. it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louis
, avery friedman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joins us from miami this week. let's start with the class action lawsuits being filed against the subway restaurant chain. this is an ireport photo of one of the many that turned up around the world and the internet showing subway sandwiches that don't measure up to the company's foot-long claim. subway won't comment on pending legal action but did release this statement -- "for 47 years customer satisfaction has been our top priority. we regret any instance where we did not full fully deliver on our promise to customers." richard, how big a deal is this? >> miguel, does size really matter? does it really matter? does that half an inch or an inch really matter? >> it matters to somebody. attorneys out there. >> to somebody, that's right. >> it seems to matter. that foot-long, all those commercials with the song, well, they're not a foot long. they're 11 inches long or 11 1/2 inches long. it's not like mcdonald's who says, look, i got a quart
stonewall, along with selma, put it with the civil rights movement and a gay bar raided by police. this says a lot about where his values are right now on this issue. and it speaks volumes about where the country's moved. >> he also mentioned women's equality as well, women's rights. what is wrong with an america, a modern america taking a basic standpoint that all men and women should be equal, whether it's the amount they're paid for the same job, their sexuality, the color of their skin. i like the way the president brought it all together and said, you know something? actually, equality should mean that -- equality. >> he did sort of say that, but the one word he never said yesterday, piers, was gun or guns and we ought to put that on the record. there's a great reason he didn't say that, i guess the same reason he never bothered to revive the assault weapons ban -- >> i'm talking about guns all night, as you know. >> talking about president obama in his second term. let's be fair about his first term. >> do you have any exception to him wanting to apparently categorize as joe biden who
, daughter of the civil rights leader joins us today. your father's personal bible is used in the swearing in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress t
men, women marrying women, they're entitled to the same exact rights, all the civil rights and liberties. >> that caused heartburn in the west wing. >> even the so-called discussion about you know, my saying i was comfortable with gay and lesbians and relationships, i knew his position. >> but you got out in front of him on it, and that is -- that can be a problem. >> i can tell you how i responded. i walked into the office. he got up, smiled, gave me a big hug, said tell you what, man, you say what is on your mind. >> you said it caused a bit of a problem here? >> it did, but not with him, not with him. >> lately joe biden has become the white house closer, cutting the deal on the fiscal cliff and trying to get one on guns. >> are you the only one who can cut deals with republicans now. >> no, no, look, first of all the only reason i would be able to close a deal is because everybody knows i speak for the president. i have his complete support for what i'm saying because i know what he wants, number one, number two, you know i think the reason we make a good team. tip o'ne
are listening to civil right activists saying the country is not as polarized and keep it in perspective but i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislateively, strike while the iron is hot. traditionally for all presidents, right now. it is the first year of their second term. remember, we had six-year itch. getting to finally the third cycle, 2014, you know, generally the minority -- the house of republicans expecting to gain seats because there's a six-year itch with the presidency and then a lame duck presidency after then and so the time to pass legislation, to have a legacy piece in the next two years and really this year. >> i'll also jump in and say that there's so many x factors out there right now. the arab spring i think we think it's a good thing right now but we don't know. we don't know what will happen in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> just a year or two talking about al qaeda being decimated and now algeria and mali and libya and others. >> i think from a foreign policy standpoint, the a
presidents? >> the temptation is to say yes, although we are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is g
are listening to several civil rights activists today saying it's not as polarized as when we were watching the march on washington. i think everybody has been saying to the president, in terms of legislatively strike while the iron is hot. and all presidents re-elected to a second term, it's right now, the first year of their second term. remember, the six-year itch, when you get to the third cycle of the congressional elections, 2014, generally the minority, the house of republicans are expected to gain seats because there's this six-year itch. the time to pass legs. is in the next two years and really this year. >> i will jump in and say there's so many x factors out there right now, the arab spring, i think we think is a good thing right now, we don't know. we don't know what's going to han in all these places across the middle east. we hope democracy takes footing but we don't know. >> and in a year or two we were talking about al qaeda being decimated and now we're seeing nigeria and mali. >> right, i think his attention is going to be torn back to the middle east. it just will. my pr
into little rock. not into berlin, but little rock to enforce desegregation, he signed the first civil rights law since the civil war. he hardly spoke about that in the second inaugural. he mentioned it, but hardly. i think these presidents have no idea what they're about to encouldn'ter. >> and outside events end up shaping the legacy. the president's maximum political power and validation is right now in this moment and in the next year, and the question is, did he strike while the iron is hot, and take to the tendency which will be to appeal to the democratic base and try to ram something through, or does he do something which may be against his nature and try to reach out to republicans, work with maybe marco rubio on immigration, and try to have a real legacy. >> i think your former boss saying, i have political capital to spend and i'm going to spend it. do you see the same for president obama? >> i do. and the interesting thing is, mandates are that which you create as the president. you can create more and do more if you do well. if the economy comes back and you can convince people t
of illinois, that will have a whole bunch of american flags on it, not to mention the civil rights float that's going to be here, the mlk float, a lot of people just very excited. we are pleased, very happy, relieved that it was not like four years ago where it was freezing cold, but still a lot of folks who are coming in. they're bundled up. they're ready to go. soledad? >> suzanne, it's very interesting. i remember four years ago when i was sitting next to david gergen, presidential adviser, and when the motorcade was going down the parade route, and then it stopped, and president obama and the first lady got out of their car. he was really stressed by that. he was almost, i think it's fair to say, in a panic. he was so nervous because, of course, he was just worried. worried about the security, worried about the nation's first black president who had been sworn in, and i remember that moment when they finally got back in the car, he breathed a sigh of relief, kind of slumped in his chair, and said, oh, i'm so glad that moment is over. for secret service, i would imagine too, the same feeli
civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit filed to try and stop the city. hazel dukes is the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> reporter: it's about? >> economic disparity. and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big corporate people, again, have their own way. >> reporter: convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp, along with the hispanic federation, argue that small and minority-owned businesses will feel is a disproportionate impact. then, there's the obesity epidemic. non-hispanic blacks, according to the cdc, have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp followed a legal brief in support of beverage companies, saying, to tackle the public health crisis of obesity, it's developed a holistic, educational program called project help. the funding for that project, according to the naacp's website, is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. duke says the new york chapte
is getting high-profile, but unlikely support. one of the nation's oldest civil rights groups is taking a stand in support of beverage companies. the new york chapter of the naacp is backing a lawsuit to try and stop the city. hazel dukes the new york chapter president. >> it's not about race. >> it's about -- >> economic disparity and how the small business is being punished while we allow the big, corporate people, again, to have their own way. >> convenience stores like 7-eleven are exempt. the naacp argue that small and minority owned businesses will feel a disproportionate impact. nonhispanic blacks have the highest rates of obesity at 44%, followed by mexican americans at 39%. the naacp filed a legal brief, to say to tackle the public health crisis on obesity, it developed a holistic educational program, called project health. the funding for that according to the naacp's website is the coca-cola foundation, the philanthropic arm of the company. the new york chapter received $75,000 in the past two years. is there a conflict? >> absolutely not. >> if this was the first time coca-c
, the humiliation that i went through. it was -- it was the toughest four years i've ever had. and when civil rights took action, i -- oh, my gosh. tears of joy. i know that people after me can now participate in high school sports without going through the battle that i had to. >> tatiana, i think some people watching they don't understand how the government could sort of inject sbooits a school and say you must allow disabled athletes to compete equally with able-bodied athletes because athleticism is different. we have paralympics and olympics, special olympics and olympics, but what exactly can be done to change some of the nature of athletics in schools so that there isn't this complete segregation? >> well, you know, when i went into high school, it's about opportunity and it's about being involved with your peers. and it's really about educating that. whether you have a disability or not, everyone should be involved. and i think it's great that, you know, it's being taken into action into schools. you know, this opens up huge doors, you know. like people going to college right after high scho
holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader. now, when the president takes the oeath of office, he's going to use a bible that belonged to dr. king. the president and vice president joe biden honored the nation's fallen soldiers today as well during a wreath laying ceremony at arlington national cemetery. it took place shortly after the vice president was sworn in. >> this is the president aes day and the president's moment in the spotlight but when the ceremony is done, all the parties, mr. obama will still have to deal with the republican led house of representatives, divided government in washington. sharon peter king of new york, the congressman with the best last name in congress, is with us this evening. mr. chairman, it's good to see you. as a republican and a member of a republican caucus that has had its own internal nights in recent days, what can the president do? he's a democrat. you know the partisanship. what can he do to hit a reset button. >> the partisanship is there. from the president's perspective, i think he should not be, i don't know if arrogant is the right
an awful lot and passionately, and rightfully so, about rights, about civil rights. he didn't talk at all about civic responsibilities. and the thing i remember best about kennedy's speech is ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. that's one of the things really missing in our country now and it's gone away over the last 15 years. we're trying to have democracy without citizenship. >> also had a chance to talk vermont senator bernie sanders at the american legions inaugural ball. he's the longest-serving independent in congressional history. he's also chair of the senate veterans affairs committee and he's talking about how concerned he is there are cuts to social program will hurt the military and families. i asked how does he plan to work with republicans to bring him closer to his side. >> i think republicans will be getting -- are beginning to catch on. they're beginning to understand the american people do not think that it makes sense to cut back on programs like social security, medicare, medicaid, veterans' needs and say, oh, yeah, we shoul
this is a civil rights issue of now, of today, and we need to make it the civil rights issue and really talk about what's involved, the lives that are involved. >> and i just want to make it clear, you're anti-abortion rights, that's right? >> that's correct, yes. >> just to follow-up to that first question about why the poll numbers have risen and the number of people who support abortion rights. during the election, as you know, todd akin, richard mourdock, two men running for federal office said some unwise things perhaps about race and abortion. do you think that kind of hurt your cause? >> oh, i'm sure it did, and we had -- those clips were run over and over and over and over again and there's no way that that did not affect public opinion. it's unfortunate. i think both of those candidates have very good pro life voting records. what they said was simply unfortunate. they clearly did not know how to communicate what it is that they believe and why they believe it and i think that it became a huge liability for them costing them both of their races. >> now the other side would say, you know,
by force. so how dangerous are its threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially open
fifteen percent or more. >>> now to a story about civil rights and soda. the naacp is fighting the ban on big sugary drinks in new york city. it is supposed to go into effect in march. now, restaurants and other venues won't be able to sell sugary drinks and cups larger than 16 ounces. all to combat new yorkers' weight problem as the mayor explained when the board of health approved the measure in september. >> nearly 60% of adult new yorkers are overweight or obese and each faces a greater risk of developing a host of diseases including type 2 diabetes, cancer, hypertension and heart disease and, of course, obesity doesn't just affect adults. among new york city kids, nearly 40% are overweight or obese. >> joining me now is hazel dukes, president of the naacp new york state conference. miss dukes, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> listen, when we think about the great fights of the naacp, we think about civil rights, we think about voting rights, we think about desegregating schools. and now sugary drinks. your group joined with hispanic federation and filed a j
, in the speech the president also broke ground by promising to push for expanded civil rights for gays and lesbians. aside from his health care reform law, this could be the greatest legacy, the biggest legacy of his time in office. a case that is now before the supreme court could force the administration into making new federal policy on this front. it could force the administration to decide whether federal benefits will be extended to same-sex couples in the next year, wolf. >> so now that he's laid out very specifically -- i was surprised how specific he went yesterday in the inaugural address, his priorities for the second term, i assume in his state of the union address in february that he he will go into details with more specifics. is that what you're hearing? >> reporter: yes, wolf. i was not surprised that he laid out sign posts about where he wanted to make progress. what he wasn't going to do in this speech was get into detail. so where he laid out markers on these major issues, we will now hear much more policy detail in the state of the union and the white house is sayin
know, we can't help but remember the civil rights movement and really we don't need another george wallace copycat. i think what we hear is someone that says, i don't want to obey these laws because i don't agree with them and that's not really his role. his role is the sheriff and it's to enforce the law. he doesn't get to decide what's constitutional and what's not. >> he told me he would, if, of course, there are no federal gun control laws passed just yet, but if there are, he says he will go to the attorney general and discuss with him whether it's constitutional and then he will make a decision. but i think in the end he kind of said, well, i'm going to uphold the law. do you believe him? >> well, i think this might be some level of sort of political grandstanding. i think, you know, he probably made these statements to play to the tea party base but i think there's a reality that, you know, any judge would force him to uphold the law and, you know, any judge would sort of advise him to follow the law. i don't think anyone is going to say, go ahead and balk federal law just b
system. labor organizations, civil rights groups called for action, including those young immigrants who are willing but unable to enter the military. >> they let me know you're undocumented. you can't register. >> he's willing to fight and die for the united states of america. there's just one problem. the arizona resident does not have legal documents to live in the country. >> if you believe in something and you're willing to die for it, that's all it comes down to. >> reporter: as an immigrant brought to this country by his parents when he was 4, the 19-year-old callfies for what is known as deferred action. president obama's policy allows some young immigrants who meet age, education, criminal background requirements to stay in the country temporarily without fear of deportation, but it does not allow them to serve in the armed forces, which is something that arizona resident maria diaz, is also trying to do. >> would you be willing to join the military yourself? and if you aren't, then why would you turn down somebody who is willing to die for a nation that it's all they have known
. the church of scientology was founded in 1954. its stated goals to help people "live in a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights." members paid to take courses designed to help them work through issues of their past and reach a higher state of consciousne consciousness. church members are tested with a device that is used to monitor their feelings and reactions. hubbard died in 1986 and since then this man has been the leader. he, like hubbard before him, oversees a religious order inside the church. an order that is responsible for church management. members sometimes wear naval style uniforms and dedicate their life to the church promises to remain in the church for reincarnated lives to come. it claims that 10 million members worldwide, 6 million in the u.s. in 2009, then church spokesman tommy davis put it this way. >> he's responsible for the current renaissance the church is experiencing and the church has doubled in size in the last five years and flourished under his leadership. >> according
. ron hubbard in 1954. its stated goals to help people "live in a civilization without insanity, without criminals and without war where the able can prosper and honest beings can have rights." members payto take courses designed to help them work through issues from their past and reach a higher state of consciousness. to understand what's holding them back, church members are tested with a device called an e-meter that's used to monitor their feelings and reactions. l. ron hubbard died in 1986, and since then this man, david miscavige, has been the leader. he, like hubbard before him, oversees a religious order inside the church, an order that is responsible for church management called the sea organization. members of sea-org sometimes wear naval-style uniforms. they dedicate their lives to the church, signing billion-year contracts, promising to remain in the church for many reincarnated lives to come. the church of scientology says it's opened some 170 churches around the globe and claims 10 million members worldwide, 6 million in the u.s. in 2009, then church spokesman tommy davis
mother who has been rumored over the last several months since the civil war began to be the one encouraging him to crack down more forcefully. she is the widow of bashar al assad's father. >>> the announcement that women will have the right to fight. we will take a look at one unit in georgia that is ready to go. u the mvp of savings. look at that price. wow! walmart lowers thousands of prices every week. if you find a lower advertised price, they'll match it at the register. no way! yeah! touchdown! ready? get out! that's the walmart low price guarantee! see for yourself! bring in your last receipt, see how much you can save. see for yourself! get great prices on everything you need for your game time party. like oreo cookies and kellogg's special k popcornhips backed by walmart's low price guarantee. ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] nothing gets you going quite like the power of quaker oats. today is going to be epic. quaker up. >>> we
footsie games. you can't have it both ways. >> what is the right thing? >> you have to come up with a settlement. colorado law won't tell a catholic institution you can't settle. what they can't do is to hide under the cloak of civil law, and say i'm sorry, we're still pro life, but you know what? you're not really a person when you are a fetus, because we're just hiding under colorado civil law. if that's the case, then they made a mockery of catholic teaching and they should be stripped of their catholicism. >> you look at hospitals, it kind of contradicts that. when you look at the law, when it's contraception, that's one thing. but this is the law, and so i find this one a conundrum. >> the catholic church is always fighting laws. we're fighting against governor cuomo who wants to bring in nonphysicians to treat women who want abortions. the catholic church takes its dictates from natural law. as far as i'm concerned, it's not as difficult as some people may want to make it out to be not a whole lot of wiggle room if you are truly catholic. >> a catholic hospital has been s
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